ARTICLES

AMBITIONS, ARTICLES, INSPIRATION, RizeClub®

just words…?


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Being concise is a challenge, most professionals aim to write a half A4 page to describe themselves. In a FORTUNE magazine Melinda Gates is described as having great listening skills, “she acknowledges, she nods, she listens”. At RizeClub we believe that being able to describe yourself in a 20 concrete words, as well as listing 5 words that describe your ambition, your ideal next job is a true art. These 20+5 words will be much more impactful than 2 pages filled with positive yet general descriptions. Please respond to this post to add words that we have missed…

interests – robots, data, social media, retail, sustainability, relations, mobility, fashion, family, literature, globalization, food, high tech, drones, energy, people, mindfulness, travel, dance, jet-set, bottom pyramid,  automotive, culture, digital, internet,…

experience –  sales, engineering, talent development,  innovation, marketing, operations, logistics, purchasing, entrepreneur, HR, strategy, change management. supply chain, coach, consultant,…

context – start-up, upscaling, multinational, turn-around, B2B, B2C,…

skills – patience, focus, develop others, listening, presenting, communicating, analytics, optimism, forge partnerships, build relationships, asking questions, details, creative, connecting, dream big, courage, risk, learn, firing, hiring, ambition, fast, action, change, team building, continuous improvement, loyalty, decide, modesty, problem solving, energetic, coach, learning, pragmatic, 80-20, perfectionist,..

locations – USA, ASIA, EUROPE, Germany, Brazil, Shanghai, Tokyo, Barcelona… (add if relevant)

hobbies – kitesurfing, cooking, reading, travel,…


Click here for the 20 words that describe some of our RizeClub members.

 

 

ARTICLES, HUMAN RESOURCES, RizeClub®

boost innovation, introduce a Chief Incentives Officer


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Physicist and biotech entrepreneur Safi Bahcall argues in Loonshots: How to Nurture the Crazy Ideas That Win Wars, Cure Diseases, and Transform Industries that the secret to creativity as actually organizational structure versus anything else. To Bahcall, the goal is to create a structure where you get people motivated and incented to go for “loonshots,” crazy ideas that ultimately turn into big innovations.

Companies need to separate the “artists” who do primarily creative work from the “soldiers” who focus on operations and execution. 

 “The Innovation Equation,” which offers four parameters companies can use to tilt the balance in favor of innovation and away from politics. The parameters are:

  • Equity Fraction: the fraction of compensation tied to project outcomes vs. tied to rank
  • Fitness Ratio: the ratio of two measures–how well employee skills are matched to their projects, and how much politics matters to promotion decisions
  • Management Span: the number of direct reports that executives of the company have
  • Salary Growth: the increase in salary with promotion

Loonshots also advocates for a new executive position: The Chief Incentives Officer. 

click here for the full Inc. article

ARTICLES, RizeClub®

The Mueller and Oppenheimer Study – taking notes


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Students who took notes with the laptops slightly out-performed the students who wrote their notes longhand (with pen and paper) when it came to recalling specific facts. But when it came to conceptual understanding, the students who took notes by hand performed much better.

At the end of the day, it seems as though what’s most important is that however you take your notes, you phrase them in your own words, and take the time to really engage with and assess your understanding of the concepts as you’re writing them down, rather than simply transcribing everything you’re learning verbatim.

click here for the full article on dataquest.io

ARTICLES, RizeClub®

FORBES – AI powered super leaders


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Super managers will be those who can leverage AI to distill complex ideas, identify hidden patterns and plot strategies to gain a competitive edge. But tech won’t magically unleash their full potential. In the end, skill, grit and talent will determine which managers thrive in this evolving ecosystem.

Consider that business managers currently spend 54% of an average work day on administrative chores such as scheduling, budgets and reports, according to an Accenture survey in the Harvard Business Review. They spend just 10% on strategic planning and even less, 7%, engaging one-on-one with their direct reports.

Powered by AI managers will have more time to perform more valuable work. At the same time, they will be expected to move faster, fueled by data-driven insights for strategic decision making, and lead more effectively with the aid of AI-powered tools that can streamline productivity.

As AI automates more routine tasks, managers and employees will increasingly rely on “soft skills” such as emotional intelligence, creativity and critical problem solving. As a result, managers will need to hone their skills assessment expertise, identifying individual team members’ strengths and weaknesses. 

Diagnostic AI software may help them monitor workers’ job performance and engagement, but the human element needed to deploy that data artfully will be empathy.

More data helps us make better decisions. If you’re a good manager, you would generally be in a better position to make better decisions with more data

click here for the full Forbes article

ARTICLES

HBR – Replacing the Sales Funnel with the Sales Flywheel


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HBR article by Brian Halligan, November 20, 2018

Using a flywheel to describe our business allows me to focus on how we capture, store and release our own energy, as measured in  traffic and leads, free sign-ups, new customers, and the enthusiasm of existing customers. It’s got a sense of leverage and momentum. The metaphor also accounts for loss of energy, where lost users and customers work against our momentum and slow our growth.

Employee skills. In the “better product” era, when you grew, you added humans, and you placed them in specialized roles. In addition to a sales rep, you created a business development role for pre-sales, you hired a variety of hunters and farmers, you assigned an account rep to manage ongoing business. You hired and trained “I-shaped” employees who could dive deep into a specific domain. Specialists are great at handling specific customer issues. But, when you have multiple specialist roles, it means your customer is getting handed off from one specialist to another. And, if your customer is getting handed off, they are experiencing friction.

sales heroes; Joost d’Hooghe , Kristina SuttonLuca Morrone, …….

ARTICLES, INNOVATION, RizeClub®, STRATEGY

Inc. – Invite Fresh Ideas to the Table


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Create an outside team of advisors. Unlike a focus group, they are not anonymous, but purposeful in providing valuable insight about the trends in your market. Your advisory team should always provide data, not assumptions, about what is trending and emerging so your company can be ahead of the learning curve. Members of your advisory team should have term limits, so you are always on-boarding fresh ideas every 2 to 4 years. 

https://www.inc.com/carol-sankar/want-your-business-to-grow-you-need-to-invite-fresh-ideas-to-table-heres-how.html

ARTICLES, RizeClub®

HBR – Distill Your Message to Just 15 Words


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Know how to pitch.  Start with the idea and why you are the right person to take the stage and deliver this big idea. While it must be a big idea, you need to be able to communicate it in 15 words or less.

Share what the audience will take away, as well as the global impact of the talk. Don’t save the most important part of your pitch for the end; people may stop reading before they ever get to it.

Know your audience. When you do research on your audience ahead of time, it gives you the opportunity to craft your talk with the language that your audience speaks.

Know your objective.  It’s about being authentic. Even though the audience is probably not going to audibly respond to you when you’re speaking on a stage, you are in a scene with them, and when you have a clear objective in terms of what you want, and how to get it, you will be more believable and captivating from the stage, therefore building your confidence as a speaker. Think about the objective you have going into your speech. Maybe your goal is to get the audience to donate to a worthy cause, or spread the word about your ideas. If you want your audience to accept your ideas, or change their opinion about something, how are you going to get them to do it? You can inspire, motivate, or even scare them into changing their minds. But you can’t do any of those things until you know what you want the ultimate outcome to be.

Know the difference between a good talk and a bad talk. A good talk has content that is fresh and well-edited, with a clear arc that takes us on a journey. A good talk is one that is so well rehearsed that you are able to let go of the script and freely share the content in the moment. A good talk is one where your audience wants to adopt your idea at the end of the talk.

click here for the full HBR article, image by UNSPLASH

 

ARTICLES, MANAGEMENT, RizeClub®

FORBES – The Benefits Of Simplicity


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Being an effective manager is not about mastering mysterious and complicated methods.  It’s about keeping it simple and following old, proven, and even obvious ideas. What made a good leader in the past is still what makes one today: being competent, caring, and benevolent.