learning

ARTICLES, RizeClub®

The Mueller and Oppenheimer Study – taking notes


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Students who took notes with the laptops slightly out-performed the students who wrote their notes longhand (with pen and paper) when it came to recalling specific facts. But when it came to conceptual understanding, the students who took notes by hand performed much better.

At the end of the day, it seems as though what’s most important is that however you take your notes, you phrase them in your own words, and take the time to really engage with and assess your understanding of the concepts as you’re writing them down, rather than simply transcribing everything you’re learning verbatim.

click here for the full article on dataquest.io

HUMAN RESOURCES, PODCASTS, RizeClub®

LinkedIn learning – Reid Hoffman and Chris Yeh on Creating an Alliance with Employees


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RizeClub®

Mark Cuban’s four key traits for great hires


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From Inc. magazine Mark Cuban;

“The people that tend to work for me a long time, not only are smart, not only are driven, not only are learners,” 

“Anybody who reduces my stress becomes invaluable to me. I never want to get rid of them.

“The people who tend to think that they are invaluable are typically the ones who create the most stress by creating firestorms and creating drama and making things more difficult for me.

“If you are stress reducer, you’re going to do well. If you’re a drama creator, you’re not going to do well.”

image credit Getty Images

PODCASTS, RizeClub®, STRATEGY

YOUR PLAN B NEEDS A PLAN B – Nancy Lublin, Founder & CEO of Crisis Text Line – Masters of Scale podcasts with Reid Hoffman


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HOFFMAN: Notice how she keeps turning problems — in this case, piles of useless clothing —  into solutions: sources of funding. That’s why I call the best entrepreneurs “infinite learners”. The more thorny patches they hit, the more effective they become at hacking their way out. The only problem is that some CEOs — like Nancy — get a bit addicted to problem-solving. If there’s no problem to solve, well, they create some.

LUBLIN: I’m a wartime CEO. Once things get good and it’s peacetime I get bored, and I either want to like do something else wild to it or I’ll fuck it up because I’m like, “No but we can do blah blah blah!” And and so I get bored and I move on.

HOFFMAN: This is one of the byproducts of grit. It’s a sort of restless energy that eventually compelled Nancy to leave Dress for Success, once it had scaled.

CLICK HERE for the full transcript and podcast.

#MASTERSOFSCALE

FUNCTIONS, INSPIRATION, PODCASTS

HBR podcast – Use Learning to Engage Your Team


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We can see the power of using deliberate learning requirement as a way to stimulate engagement. Indeed if someone is highly experienced and fully capable from day 1 that sounds effective, but also very boring for that person.

Whitney Johnson, an executive coach, argues that on-the-job learning is the key to keeping people motivated. When managers understand that, and understand where the people they manage are on their individual learning curve — the low end, the sweet spot, or the high end — employees are engaged, productive, and innovative. CLICK HERE to LISTEN to this HBR Podcast.

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FUNCTIONS, INSPIRATION

Continuous Improvement


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Google Has an Official Process in Place for Learning From Failure – By Justin Bariso,  @JustinJBariso

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Recently, Google described its internal process for documenting and learning from mistakes, The process is ever so aptly named: the postmortem.

Identify the most important problems. Ask yourself, what do I define as a major problem? You may not always know until you see it, and that’s OK. Use those problems to help you identify future failures that are similar.

Create a record. “Our next step is to work together to create a written record for what happened, why, its impact, how the issue was mitigated or resolved, and what we’ll do to prevent the incident from recurring,” writes the Google team.

Promote growth. Not blame. The key is to encourage your people not to play “the blame game.” Rather, you want them to focus on improvement and learning.


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